HealthDay News — During 2003 to 2016, more than 86.0 percent of U.S. adults consumed sodium in excess of the Chronic Disease Risk Reduction (CDRR) intake goal (recommendation of 2,300 mg/day), according to research published in the Oct. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Lasha C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2003 to 2016 to yield temporal trends in usual sodium intake >2,300 mg/day and in mean sodium intake among U.S. adults aged 19 years or older. The authors sought to identify excess sodium intake in the context of the CDRR intake goal.

The researchers found that during 2003 to 2004 and 2015 to 2016, the percentage of U.S. adults with sodium intake above CDRR intake was 87.0 and 86.7 percent, respectively. For unadjusted or energy intake-adjusted mean sodium intake, there was no significant linear trend observed from 2003 to 2016 among U.S. adults overall. Among some groups, there were small, significant declines in mean usual sodium intake (adults aged 19 to 50 years, non-Hispanic White adults, adults with obesity, and adults without hypertension). After adjustment for energy intake, a significant change in usual sodium intake was only observed for adults aged 71 years or older and Mexican American adults.


Continue Reading

“These data can update and support national strategies, including Healthy People 2030 objectives, and recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidance to decrease sodium intake, lower hypertension risk, and improve population cardiovascular health,” the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to consulting firms.

Abstract/Full Text