HealthDay News — For patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), mavacamten improves symptoms and reduces the need for septal reduction therapy (SRT), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Washington, D.C.

Milind Desai, M.D., of the Cleveland Clinic Heart Vascular & Thoracic Institute, and colleagues examined the safety and efficacy of adding mavacamten to maximally tolerated medical therapy among patients with obstructive HCM. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to either mavacamten or placebo (56 to each).

The researchers found that after 16 weeks, 76.8 and 17.9% of placebo- and mavacamten-treated patients decided to proceed with SRT or were guideline-eligible for surgery. Significant differences were also seen for mavacamten versus placebo in secondary outcomes, including improvement in New York Heart Association Heart Failure functional class ≥I class (63 versus 21%), resting left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient at 16 weeks (14 versus 46 mm Hg), Valsalva LVOT gradient at 16 weeks (28 versus 78 mm Hg), and the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-23 clinical summary score at 16 weeks (80 versus 67).


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“There are few high-volume centers performing septal myectomy or alcohol ablations which may limit a patient’s access to optimal results and patients may need repeat interventions,” a coauthor said in a statement. “That is why it is vital to explore noninvasive options for these patients.”

Two authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Bristol Myers Squibb, the manufacturer of mavacamten; the study was funded by MyoKardia, a wholly owned subsidiary of Bristol Myers Squibb.

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