Target-Vessel Failure Rate in Scaffold vs Stent PCI

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Researchers found similar rates of target-vessel failure in both scaffold and stent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
Researchers found similar rates of target-vessel failure in both scaffold and stent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

HealthDay News — For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the rate of target-vessel failure does not differ significantly for those receiving a bioresorbable vascular scaffold or a metallic stent, according to a study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Joanna J. Wykrzykowska, MD, PhD, from the Academic Medical Center-University of Amsterdam, and colleagues randomized patients undergoing PCI to receive a bioresorbable vascular scaffold or a metallic stent (924 and 921 patients, respectively). Target-vessel failure (a composite of cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction, or target-vessel revascularization) was assessed as the primary end point.

The researchers found that the 2-year cumulative event rates for target-vessel failure were 11.7% and 10.7% in the scaffold and stent groups, respectively (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.12; 95% CI, 0.85-1.48; P =.43). The 2-year cumulative event rates were 2% and 2.7%, respectively, for cardiac death; 5.5% and 3.2%, respectively, for target-vessel myocardial infarction, and 8.7% and 7.5%, respectively, for target-vessel revascularization. The 2-year cumulative event rates were 3.5% and 0.9% for the scaffold and stent groups, respectively, for definite or probable device thrombosis (HR: 3.87; 95% CI, 1.78-8.42; P <.001).

"There was no significant difference in the rate of target-vessel failure between the patients who received a bioresorbable scaffold and the patients who received a metallic stent," the authors write.

The study was funded by Abbott Vascular.

References

  1. Wykrzykowska JJ, Kraak RP, Hofma SH, et al; for the AIDA Investigators. Bioresorbable scaffolds vs metallic stents in routine PCI [published online March 29, 2017]. N Engl J Med. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1614954
  2. Mukherjee D. Device thrombosis with bioresorbable scaffolds [published online March 29, 2017]. N Engl J Med. doi: 10.1056/NEJMe1703202
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