Physical Activity in Coronary Heart Disease Improved With Tai Chi

Share this content:
Within and between groups there were no changes in aerobic fitness.
Within and between groups there were no changes in aerobic fitness.

HealthDay News — A 6-month tai chi program is safe and improves physical activity (PA), weight, and quality of life for patients with coronary heart disease who decline to enroll in cardiac rehabilitation, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Elena Salmoirago-Blotcher, MD, PhD, from the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and colleagues conducted a phase 2 trial to examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a tai chi intervention and to assess its effects on PA, fitness, weight, and quality of life among patients with coronary heart disease declining cardiac rehabilitation enrollment. Participants were randomized to a "LITE" condition (2 sessions per week for 12 weeks; 16 participants) or a "PLUS" condition (3 sessions per week for 12 weeks and then maintenance classes for 12 weeks; 13 participants).

The researchers found that retention at 9 months was 90% and 88% for LITE and PLUS, respectively. There were no serious tai chi-related adverse events. There were significant mean between-group differences favoring the PLUS group at 3 and 6 months for moderate-to-vigorous PA (100.33 and 111.62 minutes per week, respectively), with a trend toward significance at nine months; for the percentage change in weight; and for quality of life. Within and between groups there were no changes in aerobic fitness.

"Tai chi could be an effective option to improve PA in this high-risk population," the authors write.

One author is founder and sole owner of the Tree of Life Tai Chi Center.

Reference

Salmoirago-Blotcher E, Wayne PM, Dunsiger S, et al. Tai Chi is a promising exercise option for patients with coronary heart disease declining cardiac rehabilitation. J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Oct 11;6(10).

You must be a registered member of The Cardiology Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-Newsletters