Role of Coffee Consumption in Heart Failure, Stroke Outcomes

Share this content:
Data from the Framingham Heart Study was used to investigate dietary factors associated with heart failure and stroke outcomes.
Data from the Framingham Heart Study was used to investigate dietary factors associated with heart failure and stroke outcomes.

Heart failure risk and adverse stroke outcomes may be reduced with regular coffee consumption, according to research presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, held November 11-15, 2017, in Anaheim, California.1

Initial data were gathered from the diet domain of the Framingham Heart Study and later validated with data from the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Forest machine learning methods were used to identify diet-related factors that had an effect on the risk for heart failure and stroke.

The investigators found that in addition to known risk factors — including blood pressure, age, and cholesterol — regular consumption of red meat and coffee were “found to be important in predicting heart failure and stroke.”

Results were confirmed by means of survival analysis, with coffee intake being associated with both conditions, decreasing the risk for heart failure and stroke by 7% and 8%, respectively (P =.001 for both).

“The risk assessment tools we currently use for predicting whether [heart disease might develop in] someone, particularly heart failure or stroke, are very good, but they are not 100% accurate,” said Laura M. Stevens, data scientist for the Precision Medicine Institute at the American Heart Association, in a press release.2

David Kao, MD, study senior author and assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, emphasized the benefits of machine learning, noting that it “may be a useful addition to the way we look at data, and [may] help us find new ways to lower the risk of heart failure and strokes.”2

References

  1. Stevens L, Görg C, Kao D. Coffee intake affects heart failure and stroke survival and is significant in predicting heart failure and stroke risk. Presented at: American Heart Association 2017 Scientific Sessions; November 11-15, 2017; Anaheim, CA. Abstract M2040.
  2. Drinking coffee may be associated with reduced risk of heart failure and stroke [news release]. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association. Published November 13, 2017. Accessed November 13, 2017. 
You must be a registered member of The Cardiology Advisor to post a comment.

Upcoming Meetings

Sign Up for Free e-Newsletters