Predictors of All-Cause Mortality Post-Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

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Female gender independently predicts all-cause mortality post-PCI.
Female gender independently predicts all-cause mortality post-PCI.

HealthDay News—Female gender is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published in the The American Journal of Cardiology.

Vijay Kunadian, MBBS, MD, from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, and colleagues examined gender differences and predictors of all-cause mortality after PCI in patients with stable angina pectoris and acute coronary syndrome in the British Cardiovascular Intervention Society (BCIS: 368,492 patients) and the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR; 89,769 patients) data sets.

The researchers found that female gender was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality at 30 days and 1 year after PCI in the BCIS registry (odds ratios [OR], 1.15 and 1.08, respectively). Similarly, female gender was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality at 30 days and 1 year in the SCAAR registry (OR, 1.15 and 1.09, respectively). There was no statistically significant interaction between age and gender with all-cause mortality at 30 days (BCIS, P =.59; SCAAR, =.40) or 1 year (BCIS, P =.11; SCAAR, P =.83) in either dataset.

"Despite advances in care, women compared with men continue to experience higher all-cause mortality after PCI for coronary artery disease," the authors write. "Strategies and further research are warranted to better address the management of coronary artery disease in women with possibly earlier diagnosis and more tailored treatments."

Reference

  1. Kunadian V, Qiu W, Lagerqvist B, et al, on behalf of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research and Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registries. Gender differences in outcomes and predictors of all-cause mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (data from United Kingdom and Sweden). Am J Coll Cardiol. 2017;119(2):210-216. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.09.052. 
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